Tube Tech construction site cleaning features in ‘Wet News’

Set concrete causes a drainage problem in the capital, solved by Tube Tech

Leading UK water industry publication Wet News recently featured a complex cleaning operation undertaken by Tube Tech at a residential construction project in London’s Docklands area.

The feature highlighted the problems caused by washing down of construction machinery and equipment that have been used for the movement or installation of concrete, particularly to drainage systems as the wash-down water makes its way into the local drainage network. Over time, this wash-down water forms set concrete throughout even newly laid drainage pipes, potentially affecting the long-term viability of these drainage systems. And this was the stage at which Tube Tech was awarded the contract after various cleaning contractors were unsuccessful in resolving the issue at hand, with urgency a factor in this case.

With no pipe network drawings available, Tube Tech knew this would be a complex operation to resolve, especially as the proven system normally used in such situations was deemed to be too much of a time-consuming option for the client. To add to that, the teams’ initial attempts to remove the concrete proved too slow and saw them regroup and develop better technology to cope with the confines of the construction site. Managing director Mike Watson discussed the challenges this project offered, “We have been concrete clearing on projects of this nature for many years, but this one threw several challenges at us that even we had not met before.” The solution to these issues was a combination of the development and introduction of the use of polymer infused ultra-high-pressure water, along with a biodegradable chemical, mechanical tooling and high-pressure jetting.”

Just five working days later, the success of the fouling removal operation was completed, with Tube Tech’s advanced cleaning methods also limiting any potential damage to the pipeline material. In fact, after undertaking a full pipeline inspection to highlight where any damage had occurred, only 5% of the pipeline showed any damage; far less than expected for such an operation.

Commenting on the concrete clearing operations, Mike Watson said, “Working together and pooling the experience of our crew and technical team, we were able to come up with a methodology that ultimately enabled us to complete to the full satisfaction of the client. On site, it was the skill and tenacity of our crew tha5t made this operation successful with very little damage to the pipes in question. The whole team should be very proud of the work they completed.”

Read the full article in the January 2018 issue of WET NEWS